Ableton Announced Live 11: Here’s What You Need To Know

Ableton just announced the launch of Live 11, the predecessor of the widely popular Ableton Live 10. As does any updated software, Live 11 is expected to feature several updates including a handful of new instruments, devices, MPE compatibility, comping, and a few new features built to give you more control over your live performances. Let’s take you through these new features and tell you why you should as excited for Live 11 as we are.

Comping

First on the list of major updates is the new comping ability. Live 11’s comping ability allows you to record several takes and cherry pick the best parts so you can create the perfect track. Comping is great for recording vocals, live instruments, and even works with MIDI. Comping also gives you the ability to link multiple tracks so you can synch your edits. This video from Ableton demonstrates the power of this awesome new feature:

New Devices

Hybrid Reverb, Spectral Resonator, Spectral Time, PitchLoop89, and six new instruments inspired by natural sounds are the new devices you can expect from Live 11. These devices will operate like previous Ableton Live 10 devices and will be just as easy to add to your tracks. If you want to get a bit of a demo of these new devices, you can fiddle around with different combinations of samples and presets for all these devices on Ableton’s site here.

The PitchLoop89 devices appears to be the biggest and most powerful of the additions to Live 11. Based on the demo, PitchLoop89 sounds great on everything, from vocals to instruments. You’ll have control over awesome glitched out reverb and delay effects as well as an impressive pitch shifter. The Hybrid Reverb and Spectral Resonator devices also offer lots of control over your sounds and even the demo presets sound awesome.

Check out this video that highlights the power of these new devices:

MPE Compatibility 

Next on the list of updates for Live 11 is MPE compatibility. MPE (MIDI Polyphonic Expression) controllers use multiple dimensions of MIDI data like velocity, pitch, and vibrato to make your music more expressive. The ROLI Seaboard is a great example of a controller that is capable of capturing your subtle expressions in real time. Live 11 now makes it possible for you to record in real time and edit pressure, slide, and velocity automations on your MIDI tracks. If you own an Ableton Push controller, this expanded MPE sensitivity really turns your gear into an expressive musical paintbrush.

Here’s a video from Ableton showcasing Live 11’s new MPE compatibility:

New Sounds, Live Performance, and Unpredictability

Live 11 is introducing three sets of traditional instruments, a really beautiful sounding upright piano, a brass quartet, and string quartet. Along with these instruments are three new sound packs meant to spark your creativity. You can listen to some samples of the instruments and sound packs on Ableton’s site.

For those who use Ableton Live for live performances, there are some new features for you too. Live 11 brings a new flexible tempo system that listens to incoming audio and adjusts the tempo of your project to match. This is great if you incorporate live instruments like drums in your performances. Macro Snapshots also allows you to save your perimeters from live performances so you can revisit your old sounds. This video from Ableton breaks down what’s new for live performers:

The last big update from Live 11 is a feature that brings chance and randomness to your MIDI notes. You can now set probabilities of notes hitting as well as randomized note velocities to create more natural sounding drum grooves or melodies.

Ableton Live 11 does not have a set launch date but is expected to arrive in early 2021. You can learn more about all the new updates and features on Ableton’s announcement page here.

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